Review: “Argonauts” by Kevin Kneupper

Review-"Argonauts” by Kevin Kneupper

A review by Vanessa.

Medea and Jason have never met before.  Of course they haven’t met; she is merely a stakeholder in the major corporation turned ecosystem/city that is Argos, while Jason is a shareholder.  The corporation runs everything.  In a world where nearly all of the jobs are run by artificially intelligent robots Madea just happens to have a unique and valuable talent for being able to manipulate genes, known as genomancy, in order to give people special traits.  She works for the corporation’s warriors, known as the Argonauts, giving them whatever attributes they wish.  She can give them a bear’s strength, fur, and claws, or even a fish’s gills and ability to swim.  Where her heart truly lies though, is with the work she is allowed to do for the poor stakeholders of Argos.  She can fix a little girl’s stutter, or remove the genes prone to cancer.  But despite her talent, and her enviable possession of one of the few remaining jobs still done by people, she gets no respect. Especially not from the warriors, who refuse to acknowledge her importance to their accomplishments, and not from Jason when they meet for the first time.

Jason, unlike Medea, is a shareholder; rich, powerful, and most importantly he has a voice in the management vote for the CEO of Argos.  This is of particular significance to Pelias, the current CEO.  When Jason’s father Aeson dies of the overindulgences that are often thrown at shareholders to keep them happy, Jason finds an unexpected opportunity.  He has always wanted to join the Argonauts, but with an unsupportive father his dream never came true.  Now, with a CEO who is salivating over the opportunity to get his hands on Jason’s shares, and most importantly his votes, he is going to get his dream.  Jason though, wants nothing to do with Medea.  He has spent his entire life honing himself into the perfect warrior, and he believes that what she does is nothing more than a way to cheat.  Medea is none too happy about being forced along on Jason’s first mission, either.  But the two of them realize quickly that they have to find a common ground, as one thing after another goes wrong on their mission to Colchis. They have been sent to the competing corporation’s city in search of the golden fleece; a data bank of genetic information that just may change the rules of genomancy forever.

I think it is beneficial that I was not aware of the specific details of Jason and Medea’s story before reading this book.  I knew enough of the basics so that I could understand when the author was pulling in recognizable places and characters from the original story.  But the distinctive twists on those elements made it like a whole new story for me.  Kneupper weaves the classic Greek elements into a fascinating new world in which many of the current world’s fears, and dreams, about the future are essentially realized.  All the jobs have been taken over by robots, nobody works so the government has to give out a basic minimum to each person, while the corporations that run everything constantly compete to convince people to invest their basic minimum with them.  Gene therapy has leapt forwarded to the ability to change people’s genes almost however they want, and extend lives.  This makes for a really interesting setting in which the story takes place. The characters, while recognizable, do lack in growth and tend towards the one dimensional.  The romance between the two characters was bit hurried, and the secondary characters were underutilized.  Overall, though, I liked this book.  Despite my choice to rate it 3.5 out of 5 stars I would recommend it for an interesting and entertaining read.

My rating: 3.5/5 stars.

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