Review: “Indexing (Indexing #1)” by Seanan McGuire

A review by Amanda.

Special Agent Henrietta Marchen, or Henry as she prefers, works for an agency that doesn’t officially exist, called ATI Management Bureau. Her job, and that of her team, is to prevent fairy tales from gaining a foothold in the real world. The fairy tale narrative is almost a living being, and all it wants is to bring those classic stories to life, with disastrous results. The narrative seeks people who fit the circumstances of certain fairy tales and then manipulates events to get the story to play out, only no one gets a happy ending. Dispatchers at the Bureau monitor events for signs of incursions. Henry’s team is responsible for verifying and averting whichever tale is playing out, using the valuable company Index as a resource. The team is made up of people who are aware of the narrative and what it can do, either because of a brush with it on the periphery or because they managed to avert or pause their own story.

This book is a page-turner, especially for fans of twisted fairy tales and urban fantasy. Fans of Seanan McGuire’s other works, such as the October Daye series, will recognize her quick wit and clever twists. Henry is stubborn, intelligent, and thinks outside the box. Having a personal connection to more than one narrative, she is willing to do whatever it takes to keep fairy tales out of the real world. The supporting characters are diverse people with very distinct personalities. Plotwise, the twists and turns are well thought out and unexpected. The story does continue past what was assumed to be a natural ending, and gets a bit convoluted. Hopefully that will clear up in future books. There are several character dynamics that will be exciting to explore, both romantically and otherwise. Indexing not only turns classic stories on their heads, but also skims the surface of fate vs free will, and if good and evil are really so black and white.

The first two books have been released in both paperback and ebook format.

My rating: 4/5 stars.

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Review: “The Sight (Devil’s Isle #2)” by Chloe Neill

A review by Amanda.

This review may contain spoilers for book one, The Veil. I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.

Book two picks up a few weeks after the events of book one. Claire has been dividing her time between running the Royal Mercantile, learning the bounty hunter trade with Liam, and getting lessons in using her magic from Malachi. The tension between Liam and Claire is heavy since Liam has made it clear that his honor won’t allow him to be with her romantically; if she is discovered as a Sensitive he would be the one to turn her in to live on Devil’s Isle, which would break both of their hearts. Claire’s single-minded goal of staying busy to keep her mind off of her non-existent love life gets a boost when someone starts murdering Paras without care for human casualties.

A magic-hating human has developed a following. Calling themselves Reveillon, this cultish group blames magic, Paras, and Sensitives for the Zone’s troubles. Their leader has convinced them that the answer to all of their problems is to eradicate all traces of magic by any means necessary. The violence escalates even further and Claire, alongside her friends and allies, must act quickly to save those who have been targeted by Reveillon.
The Sight moves at a slightly faster pace than the previous book and makes for a quick read. The plot is a bit predictable, but it still manages to be interesting. While Claire still does not stand out amongst all of the urban fantasy heroines (see my review of The Veil), the supporting characters gain more depth. The romantic tension kicks up a notch and things get nice and steamy. Claire continues to hold her own against whatever life throws at her, with one or two exceptions. I imagine book three, The Hunt, will challenge her ability to roll with the punches. This series is great for those readers looking for a fun, quick read, with a classic urban fantasy feel. Fans of Patricia Briggs’ Alpha and Omega series, Kim Harrison’s Peri Reed books, and Charlaine Harris’s Aurora Teagarden series will likely enjoy these books. Make sure to pick up book one, The Veil, and look for book three, The Hunt, to be released on September 26th.

My rating: 3.5/5 stars.

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Review: “Colt Harper: Esteemed Vampire Cat” by Tyrolin Puxty

Review-

A review by Niraja.

An electronic version of this book was supplied to the reviewer by the author in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.

Colt Harper is a vampire cat whose mission in life is to avenge cats who have been wronged by humans.  Assigned community service as punishment for taking his mission a little too seriously, Colt finds himself a volunteer at a community theater.  As part of his assignment, he must not only tolerate but cooperate with a werewolf and a tickle monster, his fellow volunteers in punishment.  As if that wasn’t enough, the theater is run by a human woman who fosters stray cats, and for whom he seems to be developing a crush.  To top it all off the chasers, a.k.a. monster hunters, seem to have it in for his odd group of new… friends.  Colt must summon the will to go beyond saving his own skin to help his fellow monsters and the human girl without going too far and risking eternity in monster hell.

Colt Harper: Esteemed Vampire Cat is the first book in a new series by author Tyrolin Puxty. The series introduces some refreshing new concepts while staying true to the nature of urban fantasy.  The characters are not very deeply developed yet but have interesting personality traits and quirks that have the potential for growth and development in future books.  While the plot is simple overall, there are some interesting ideas and small twists that keep it engaging, and not completely predictable.  The book ends in a manner that allows the story to stand on its own, yet opens up possibilities for further installments.  So whether you want to read only this one story or continue with the series you won’t be left hanging.

As an avid reader of urban fantasy, I enjoyed both the new world concepts as well as the new types of supernatural creatures (or monsters) introduced.  The new world concepts were simple yet creative and introduced ideas I had not yet read, which was refreshing.  There was enough detail to create a basic understanding of concepts and potential to further flesh out details in future books.  In terms of characters, while I was not able to relate to the main character I found his cat nature amusing and on point.  I also appreciated that the character did have some moments of struggle and personal growth which change how he relates to the other characters and the world.  

Overall I enjoyed the book.  It was a quick and amusing read.  I believe that the story and characters could have had a bit more detail or deepness to them, but as a first book in a series, there is a lot of potential for growth and development.  If you like urban fantasy or cats and are looking for a quick light read, I think you will enjoy this book.

My rating: 3.5/5 stars.

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Review: “The Dark Intercept” by Julia Keller

Review- The Dark Intercept by Julia Keller

A review by Amanda.

In the year 2294, on a glorious world called New Earth, crime is almost non-existent. Thanks to a highly advanced computer program, called the Intercept, crimes are stopped before they are committed. The Intercept monitors and records the emotional responses of every citizen on both New Earth and Old in order to keep the peace. Each citizen is implanted with a chip that allows the Intercept into their minds, giving up their right to keep their emotions private. When an emotional spike indicates a potential crime, the people whose job is to utilize the Intercept watch closely to determine if an intervention is necessary. The Intercept will then use an individual’s worst emotional memories against them, creating a horrible feedback loop that incapacitates the offender. Violet Crowley, daughter of New Earth’s Founding Father, is one of the employees of the Protocol Hall, where they watch for patterns that indicate potential criminal activity. It is her job to decide if an intervention is needed, a job she does not take lightly.

Violet understands the necessity of the Intercept and how much easier life is with it. Her curiosity about Old Earth and sympathies for the poor people who still live there pushes her to ask difficult questions, especially when her crush, a cop named Danny, makes unauthorized trips to Old Earth and won’t tell her why. Violet decides to investigate on her own, and the answers she finds only lead to more confusion. When threats arise against people she cares about and to the society her father painstakingly built, Violet takes matters into her own hands.

This story has some similarities to Minority Report, without the precognition aspect, and has a frightening take on futuristic class warfare. When New Earth was created, the deciding factor for who was allowed to come along and who had to stay behind was mostly wealth. Many doctors and scientists left Old Earth and the people who were forced to stay behind had very little resources. Many are dying of fevers and infections and crime is rampant there, even though many citizens have had chips implanted because they are rarely monitored by the Protocol Hall.

Violet is a lovely character if a bit naive in the beginning. She loves her friends and her family and is torn between following the rules and protecting her loved ones. She feels some ambivalence towards the Intercept, despite accepting its usefulness. The supporting characters are a little less developed than Violet, although still interesting. There are a couple of unexpected twists that added more substance to the plot, and the ending could work as a standalone or to continue in a series.

My rating: 4/5 stars.

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Review: “The Gender Game” by Bella Forrest

Review: “The Gender Game” by Bella Forrest

A review by Vanessa.

I purchased this book from Amazon after an advertisement linked me to it and the synopsis seemed interesting.

In a world where your gender rules your fate, Violet Bates is happy being a woman born in Matrus, where the females rule the government. Violet doesn’t know what exactly caused the great war that brought such destruction upon them, but everyone knows why the surviving populace living in the only fertile mountainous area left, split into two different ruling factions. Men had proven to be monstrous, and violent, and had already brought about the eradication of their previous way of life. Women thought it was time for females to lead. The men disagreed, and the majority of the women left, with those men who agreed, to form a separate government in the flat lands beyond the toxic river. Peace reigns in Matrus; power and masculinity reigns in Patrus.

Even though 19-year-old Violet committed a crime that put her in jail until her upcoming 21st birthday, she was better off than in Patrus where women were no more than property. Still, when her brother was marked at an early age as unfit to reside in Matrus, she loved him too much to see him condemned and tried to smuggle him across the river. She failed, and he was taken away. Now all she wants is to get through the rest of her sentence without trouble. But fate has other plans when Violet’s scuffle with another prisoner ends in womanslaughter. The Queen has made Violet an offer: help with a secret mission to recover something that was stolen, or face death as punishment. The mission comes with a heavy price. Namely, marriage to the Queen’s spy in Patrus. If she succeeds, she might just get the chance to see her brother again. But first she must survive having no rights, and no bodily autonomy. Still, it’s not all bad. Violet has always loved the thrill of physical combat, which is outlawed in Matrus. But in Patrus she is drawn to a lean handsome fighter who serves as a warden for the government her new scientist husband works for. Things just aren’t what they seemed to her before, and she finds herself torn between her mission and her heart.

The classic futuristic dystopian genre gets an interesting twist in this book. Focusing on the gender dichotomy as the source of the main conflict is an all too familiarly painful, and eerily possible, future. The turns the story takes are expertly executed, and will definitely keep the reader engaged. Violet, the main character, is a highly relatable lead to the story. Her personal journey is particularly captivating, as she discovers more about the world outside of her own experience. A rather large flaw in the world building, however, is the complete lack of acknowledgment of what happens to those who would be transgendered, non-gendered, or outside of the societal expectations for sexual orientation. Considering that this world is supposed to be the future fate of our own world, it is insanely disappointing that such a large part of humanity is simply not addressed. I have to hope that the great potential for what could have been a fascinating conflict within this world will be covered in future books. That being said, it has been a very long time since a book has actually kept me up all night to finish it. And though the prose could be just a little bit stiff at times, it flowed just right in all the places that mattered the most; the first moments of Violet’s real self-discovery, the height of the romantic tension, and the shocking twist of the story’s climax. I will definitely continue on in this series.

My rating: 3.5/5 stars.

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Review: “Rise of the Chosen (Lifeblood #1)” by Anna Kopp

A review by Amanda.

Samantha Shields lives in a post-apocalyptic world, but it isn’t exactly the one we were expecting based on movies and books. Almost two decades ago, a mysterious blood disease began infecting every person on the planet. Called Lifeblood, it wakes the dead (no matter the cause of death), turning 99% of them into mindless creatures with enhanced strength and senses. Unlike traditional zombies, the Woken have no interest in devouring flesh or brains; they only want to kill as many people as quickly as they can. A small percentage of the infected become Chosen instead. These lucky few get the super strength and enhanced senses but retain their sense of self.

Some cities, like Savannah, Georgia, where Sam lives, are protected by the Watch, a military-like installment that exists to protect the living. Steel walls surround the city, with guarded gates to let people pass in and out. The Watch is made up of both humans and Chosen, sworn to protect the citizens from the Woken. At eighteen, Sam is about to be given her first official Watch assignment when a series of tragedies strike, changing the course of her future and bringing new information to light. She has to make one difficult decision after another, without knowing who she can truly trust.

Rise Of The Chosen took a unique approach to the post-apocalyptic genre. The city of Savannah is described as safe, clean, and comfortable. Technology did not cease when the world ended, it simply adapted to suit the world’s new needs. The use of tech in this world was both creative and logical, and the overall world-building was excellent. The characters, however, were lacking just enough depth that they did not feel complete. Perhaps this had to do with the Chosen’s emotional limitations, which could be expanded upon in the next book. Sam was likable, if naive and indecisive, as teenagers occasionally are. She was revealed early on to be bisexual, which was a nice change from the typical romantic storylines in the YA genre. Some of the writing felt disjointed, as though the author jumped from one scene to another without the necessary transitions, but otherwise this book had me intrigued. It ended on a curious note and I am interested in seeing how the story continues in book two.

Fans of Struck by Jennifer Bosworth, Amy Tintera’s Reboot series or Unraveling by Elizabeth Norris may enjoy this book.

My rating: 3.5/5 stars.

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BOOK TOUR Review: “Butterfly Bones” By Rebecca Carpenter

Review: "Butterfly Bones" By Rebecca Carpenter

A review by Domoni.

Bethany was born with a rare bone condition. She wasn’t supposed to live past 6 months, but her scientist father will stop at nothing to save her. Especially since his wife, Bethany’s mother, died of cancer when Bethany was only 2. So he created a treatment and Bethany has been getting injections that strengthen her bones and keep her alive. At the age of 15 she easily passes for an elementary student due to her size and the fact that puberty hasn’t come her way yet. Which makes Bethany a prime target for bullies in high school. The only bright spot is her best friend Jeremiah, who just happens to be the hottest boy in school. Since all the girls want the hot football player, especially the new girl Zoey, this makes an even bigger target on Bethany’s back when jealous girls want her out of the way.  Bethany’s final teenage torment is she is also in love with Jeremiah, but it seems he only sees her as a friend.

Bethany spends most of her free time in her father’s lab at home. This is the only way she seems to have his attention. When they observe the mice he has been treating with the same new treatment he is giving Bethany behaving strangely, that’s when things get really weird. The injections use caterpillar DNA, now suddenly the mice have made cocoons. Is this what is in store for Bethany now too? If she is going to survive the metamorphosis, what will she become?

I loved this book. It had some creepy yet fascinating moments and it brought up many emotions. The author did an amazing job crafting the world around Bethany. The characters had depth and motivation, you could understand who they were and their reasons for their behaviors. I found myself angered over the constant bullying Bethany had to endure and horrified that the adults in the school turned a blind eye or shifted blame to the petite girl. As the story progressed I started to have anxiety waiting to find out what was going to happen. The ending blew me away. I will gladly read more in this series.

My rating: 5/5 stars.

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Butterfly Bones

by Rebecca L. Carpenter

Genre: YA Sci-fi

Lakewater Press

Summary:

Bethany should be dead, just like the doctors predicted. But along came the butterflies, altering the order of nature.
And now nature is hell bent on revenge.
Because when fate’s path is disrupted, it’s only a matter of time before balance must be restored.

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Rebecca Carpenter

About the Author

Rebecca Carpenter is a native of western Colorado. She is married with two grown children and has been blessed with four amazing grandchildren. She owns and directs a large childcare center where she shares her love for books. In her spare time, she freelances as a copy editor, helping others attain their writing dreams. She finds solace and clarity while spending time with her husband exploring the beautiful mountains of Colorado.

 

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